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Doug Pardee

White balance without eyedropper (CameraBag Photo)

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I suspect most people are accustomed to being able to use an eyedropper tool on a neutral part of their picture to set white balance. CameraBag doesn't offer that, but with the new Pixel Inspector window of CameraBag Photo, you can get the same general result with a bit of work.

  1. Open the Pixel Inspector window ('I' key).
  2. Click on the neutral spot that you'd normally eyedropper. Zooming in might help you pick the pixel you want.
  3. Be sure that the pixel for that neutral spot has been added to the Recent Pixels list in the Pixel Inspector window.

Now you'll need to choose which adjustment tool you want to use.

If green/magenta tint isn't a problem:

  1. Add a Temperature tool.
  2. Watch the values of the selected neutral pixel in the Recent Pixels list as you adjust the slider on the Temperature tool.
  3. Try to get the first (red) and last (blue) values for that neutral pixel to match. The middle (green) value should be similar to the other two.

Or, if green/magenta tint is a problem (steps 1-3 below are optional):

  1. Add a Saturation tool and set it to zero saturation.
  2. Remember what the pixel values are for the selected neutral pixel in the Recent Pixels list -- this will be your target value in step 6.
  3. Remove (or disable) the Saturation tool.
  4. Add a Color Balance tool.
  5. Watch the values of the selected neutral pixel in the Recent Pixels list as you adjust the sliders on the Color Balance tool.
  6. Adjust the sliders so that all three values (red, green, blue) for that neutral pixel match the target value, or each other if you skipped steps 1-3. In my (limited) experience, you may need to resort to entering numerical values for the slider settings in order to achieve sufficient precision.

You could use other color adjustment tools like Color Wheels or Coloring, but Temperature and Color Balance probably cover most of the usual cases with the least complication.

You might find that you need to be a bit pickier about which pixel you select than if you were using an eyedropper tool in another program, because this looks at only one pixel while eyedroppers often look at the average of a number of pixels in the area.

You can select up to three separate pixels to watch at the same time, which might be useful under some circumstances. For example, maybe part of the image is in shade and part in sunlight, and you want to split the difference in the white balance.

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On 11/11/2016 at 2:04 AM, Jamchild said:

Excellent stuff Doug! We do hope to add dropper functionality before long.

Drop it already, will you ;)

 

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